The Student News Site of Journalism Education Association of Northern California

JEANC

University of California A-G Course Approval

INTRODUCTION

If you are looking to have a journalism course approved by the University of California, you’ll want to get your start at UC’s A-G Course Management Portal, which includes copies of hundreds of journalism-related courses. Once you find one that you like, you can adopt it for your own school, modifying it as necessary, according to UC guidelines. Be mindful that many of the courses listed are too old to be considered current models, and before you go too far down an adoption path with a given course, you will want to get approval from both your high school course administrator and the UC Articulation Unit.

High School Articulation Unit
University of California, Office of the President
1111 Franklin Street Oakland, CA 94607
(510) 987-9570 | [email protected]

JEANC is interested in hearing about your interactions with the High School Articulation Unit regarding adoption of journalism courses. Please email us at [email protected] to let us know what you have discovered and we’ll pass helpful information on to our membership as necessary.

Certainly, we are very interested in hearing when you have a course approved — or find a great model course — and would like to spread the word in this space. Please email us at [email protected] with details.

For now, the following will have to suffice.

 

APPROVED COURSES

The University of California approves multiple different kinds of journalism courses, as summarized below:

Visual & Performing Arts (“f”)

In the “f” credit category, UC listed 11 courses with the word “journalism” in the title, divided as follows:

  • “Visual Arts” (9 “journalism” courses)
  • “Interdisciplinary Arts” (2 “journalism” courses)

College-Preparatory Elective (“g”)

In the “g” credit category, UC listed 204 courses with the word “journalism” in the title, divided as follows:

  • History /Social Sciences (1 “journalism” course)
  • English (180″journalism” courses)
  • Visual and Performing Arts (4″journalism” courses)
  • Interdisciplinary (19″journalism” courses)
Source: Data collected from the UC A-G Course Management Portal during January 2017.

None of the above-listed courses receives honors credit.

Other courses related to journalism on the UC portal can be founding by searching for “publication” and “media” — although many of the latter are media literacy courses more than production courses.

Once you find a course that you would like to adopt for your school, click on the “Model course” link in the lower left-hand corner of the course description to get started.

 

HISTORICAL NOTE

In 2006, UC approved  JrnlsmUCOct06SVUSD, an El Toro High School course that was itself a hybrid of two courses approved for Palo Alto High School and established a model for the state. The course is was designed with UC input as a production-based class that included a Beginning Journalism boot camp for the first six weeks.  The language surrounding objectives, production cycles and the boot camp was vetted by UC course evaluators, and is found in current courses throughout the state.

 

The Student News Site of Journalism Education Association of Northern California
University of California A-G Course Approval